Winning Images from World Press Photo 2018

The winners of World Press Photo 2018 were announced in Amsterdam this weekend. A lot of the nominated and winning photographers joined the World Press Photo Festival to present their work and exchange views with editors, jurors and others from the industry during panel talks. They passionately discussed important themes such as the ‘politics of representation’ or ‘the impact of a story on an individual’. Here is our selection of the winning images.

 

Evacuated – by Wally Skalij 

Wally Skalij

Evacuated horses stand tied to a pole, as smoke from a wildfire billows above them, on Zuma Beach, in Malibu, California, USA, on 10 November.

“The 2018 wildfire season in California was the deadliest and most destructive on record,
burning an area of more than 676,000 hectares. While scientists pointed to the effects of
climate change as a cause, US President Donald Trump blamed forest management.”

Instagram

 

Male Rape – by Mary F. Calvert 

Mary F. Calvert

Former US marine Ethan Hanson bathes at home in Austin, Minnesota, USA, after a sexual trauma experienced during his military service left him unable to take showers.

“During a boot camp, Ethan and fellow recruits were ordered to walk naked through a communal shower while pressed together. Ethan reported the incident, but was harassed by the other men for doing so. Nightmares and panic attacks later forced him to resign. Recent Defense Department figures show sexual assault in the military to be on the increase. Servicemen are less likely than women to report sexual trauma, fearing retaliation or stigma.”

Instagram

 

Climbing the Border Fence – by Pedro Pardo 

Pedro Pardo

Central American migrants climb the border fence between Mexico and the United States, near El Chaparral border crossing, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico.

“Refugees who were part of a caravan that originated in Honduras in October, began arriving at the border in November to find a backlog of some 3,000 people waiting to be processed into the United States, and a potential delay of months. This led to rising tensions, and to people breaking away from the caravan to attempt their own entry.”

Instagram

 

Faces of an Epidemic – by Philip Montgomery 

Philip Montgomery

The body of Brian Malmsbury is taken away after he overdosed on heroin in the basement of his family’s home, Miamisburg, Ohio, USA.

“According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more than 130 people a day in the US die after overdosing on opioids. President Donald Trump has declared the opioid epidemic a national public health emergency. The crisis has its roots in the 1990s, when pharmaceutical companies assured doctors that opioid pain relievers were not addictive. The firm Purdue Pharma, in particular, has been accused of aggressive marketing even when the effects of opioids were known. Increased prescription of opioids such as Oxycontin led to widespread misuse. Some people switched to heroin, which was cheaper, and later to synthetic opioids, which are more potent and more likely to lead to a fatal overdose.”

Instagram

 

Land of Ibeji – by Bénédicte Kurzen and Sanne de Wilde 

Bénédicte Kurzen and Sanne de Wilde

Dressed for church, Kehinde Deborah and Taiwo Celestine (10) stand on a hill near Igbo-Ora, Nigeria.

“Nigeria has one of the highest occurrences of twins in the world, particularly among the Yoruba people in the southwest. In the southwestern town of Igbo-Ora, dubbed ‘The Nation’s Home of Twins’, reportedly almost every family has at least one set. In 2018, the town hosted a Twins Festival, attended by over 2,000 pairs. The first-born twin is usually called Taiwo, meaning ‘having the first taste of the world’, while the second-born is named Kehinde, ‘arriving after the other’. Communities have developed different cultural practices in response to this high birth rate, from veneration to demonisation. In earlier times, twins in some regions were considered evil, and vilified or killed at birth. Nowadays, the arrival of twins is generally met with celebration, and many think they bring good luck and wealth. Two color filters were used, to express duality: of identity, of photographers, and of attitude to twins.”

Instagram Bénédicte
Instagram Sanne

 

The Cubanitas – by Diana Markosian

Diana Markosian

Pura rides around her neighborhood in a pink 1950s convertible, as the community gathers to celebrate her fifteenth birthday, in Havana, Cuba.

“A girl’s quinceañera (fifteenth birthday) is a Latino coming-of-age tradition marking transition into womanhood. It is a gender specific rite of passage, traditionally showcasing a girl’s purity and readiness for marriage. Families go to great expense, often celebrating with a lavish party. The girl dresses as a princess, living out a fantasy and perceived idea of femininity. In Cuba, the tradition has transformed into a performance involving photo and video shoots, often documented in a photobook. Pura’s quinceañera had a special poignancy, as some years earlier, having been diagnosed with a brain tumor, she was told she would not live beyond the age of 13.”

Instagram

 

Meet Bob – by Jasper Doest 

Jasper Doest

“Bob, a rescued Caribbean flamingo, lives among humans on the Dutch island of Curaçao. Bob was badly injured when he flew into a hotel window, and was cared for by Odette Doest who runs Fundashon Dier en Onderwijs Cariben (FDOC), a wildlife rehabilitation center. During Bob’s rehabilitation, Odette discovered that he had been habituated to humans, and so would not survive if returned to the wild. Instead, he became an ‘ambassador’ for FDOC, which educates local people about the importance of protecting the island’s wildlife.”

Instagram

 

Dakar Fashion – by Finbarr O’Reilly 

Finbarr O’Reilly

Diarra Ndiaye, Ndeye Fatou Mbaye and Mariza Sakho model outfits by designer Adama Paris, in the Medina neighborhood of the Senegalese capital, Dakar, as curious residents look on.

“Dakar is a growing hub of Franco-African fashion, and is home to Fashion Africa TV, the first station entirely dedicated to fashion on the continent. The annual Dakar Fashion Week includes an extravagant street show that is open to all and attended by thousands from all corners of the capital. Adama Paris (who has a namesake brand) is a driving force behind the fashion week, and much else on the design scene.”

Instagram

 

See all the winning images and series at World Press Photo

 

 

© All the pictures in this post are copyrighted. Their reproduction, even in part, is forbidden without the explicit approval of the rightful owners.



by Julie Hrudová, founder of StreetRepeat
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